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  1. poetsorg:

Adrienne Rich, “Natural Resources,” 1977:
My heart is moved by all I cannot save:
so much has been destroyed
I have to cast my lot with those
who age after age, perversely,
with no extraordinary power,
reconstitute the world.

    poetsorg:

    Adrienne Rich, “Natural Resources,” 1977:

    My heart is moved by all I cannot save:

    so much has been destroyed

    I have to cast my lot with those

    who age after age, perversely,

    with no extraordinary power,

    reconstitute the world.

  2. "the thing I came for:
    the wreck and not the story of the wreck
    the thing itself and not the myth
    the drowned face always staring
    toward the sun
    the evidence of damage
    worn by salt and sway into this threadbare beauty
    the ribs of the disaster
    curving their assertion
    among the tentative haunters."

     - Adrienne Rich

    (Source: blackmarksonpaper)

  3. "To read as if your life depended on it would mean to let into your reading your beliefs, the swirl of your dreamlife, the physical sensations of your ordinary carnal life; and simultaneously, to allow what you’re reading to pierce routines, safe and impermeable, in which ordinary carnal life is tracked, charted, channeled. Then, what of the right answers, the so-called multiple-choice examination sheet with the number 2 pencil to mark one choice and one choice only?"

     - Adrienne Rich, “What is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics”

    (Source: punch-in-the-face-poetry)

  4. "There must be those among whom we can sit down and weep and still be counted as warriors."

     - Adrienne Rich

    (Source: chirpingbird14)

  5. Adrienne Rich Adrienne Rich
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    Adrienne Rich

    (Source: lgbtqrolemodels)

  6. The riches of Adrienne Rich: Poet 1929 - 2012

    jaktraks:

    WASHINGTON, March 29th, 2012 - Although we may not agree with the words they choose, some poets are obviously doing their best to make people stare at things that need staring at. Adrienne Rich was such a poet.  

    She put it best herself. “Still, as a poet, I choose to sieve up old, sunken words, heave them, dripping with silt, turn them over, and bring them into the air of the present. Where every public decision has to be justified in the scales of corporate profits, poetry unsettles these apparently self-evident propositions—not through ideology, but by its very presence and ways of being, its embodiment of states of longing and desire.” (from What is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry & Poetics.)

  7. Adrienne Rich’s “Living in Sin”

    britterzzz:

    She had thought the studio would keep itself;
    no dust upon the furniture of love.
    Half heresy, to wish the taps less vocal,
    the panes relieved of grime. A plate of pears,
    a piano with a Persian shawl, a cat
    stalking the picturesque amusing mouse
    had risen at his urging.
    Not that at five each separate stair would writhe
    under the milkman’s tramp; that morning light
    so coldly would delineate the scraps
    of last night’s cheese and three sepulchral bottles;
    that on the kitchen shelf amoong the saucers
    a pair of beetle-eyes would fix her own—
    envoy from some village in the moldings…
    Meanwhile, he, with a yawn,
    sounded a dozen notes upon the keyboard,
    declared it out of tune, shrugged at the mirror,
    rubbed at his beard, went out for cigarettes;
    while she, jeered by the minor demons,
    pulled back the sheets and made the bed and found
    a towel to dust the table-top,
    and let the coffee-pot boil over on the stove.
    By evening she was back in love again,
    though not so wholly but throughout the night
    she woke sometimes to feel the daylight coming
    like a relentless milkman up the stairs.

  8. NYT :: Adrienne Rich, Influential Feminist Poet, dies at 82 NYT :: Adrienne Rich, Influential Feminist Poet, dies at 82
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